Qin Dynasty


After a long, painful, chaotic decline during the Warring States Period after Zhou, China was reunited by Emperor Qin, who founded the "short-sharp," legalistic dynasty that bears his name. In dramatically non-Confucian style, he unified the land, abolished feudalism, centralized political authority, regularized-standardized everything he could get his hands on, including the written language. He is credited with linking the border fortresses of the North into what is known today as the Great Wall. His brief reign (221-210 BCE) is not famous for major innovations in the craftsmanship of bronze or jade; however, the discovery in 1974 of the terra cotta army of Emperor Qin marks one of China's and the world's great archaeological finds. 8000 larger than life and extraordinarily realistic soldiers, archers, horses, chariots, etc. guarded the Emperor's own tomb, which has not yet been excavated.

http://www.seester.com/china/entry9.htm

(Cotterel 121; Seester)

(Cotterel 44)

 

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

Cotterel, Arthur. The First Emperor of China. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1981.

http://www.seester.com/china/entry9.htm
(home page doesn't reveal author's name, a young woman who, apparently, went traveling in China and took some pictures.)

LINKS

http://www.chinatour.com/ths/a006.htm

http://www.bowker.com/xian.htm

http://www.xjtu.edu.cn/xjnet/scenery/terracotta.html

http://lassen.ippresents.com/mchan/xian.html

http://www.eastravel.com/infor/sight/sight_xa.htm

http://www.northpark.edu/acad/history/WebChron/China/Terrawar.html